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10. How to get kernel

Linus releases the official kernel snapshots pretty often on ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/, so that may be one of the ways how to get to kernel sources. But several people find it much easier to use some CVS repository they can check out the latest and greatest tree at any time they want, with any fixes against official kernel snapshots which are needed, plus often with several new features. There are several CVS repositories for Linux, like there is one created by the ISDN people, one for the MIPS port, some people run their own CVS repositories for the kernel. The probably most used CVS for Linux kernel is located at vger.rutgers.edu, originally SPARC Linux CVS, which since the creation in 1996 grew into a hub of SPARC, networking, PPC, PCI development, and a place where people hack in several other areas of the kernel. This CVS repository is available as anonymous read-only CVS (see ftp://vger.rutgers.edu/pub/linux/README.CVS for description on how to start using it) and any active kernel developer has a chance of getting even write access to it (once you'll get used with the anonymous read-only CVS and if you really need it, mail to davem@vger.rutgers.edu and discuss such possibility with him).

Most of the kernel hacking issues could not be covered by this paper, it would eat a lot of paper and even very long books probably would not cover it sufficiently. What you should learn is that whenever is something unclear to you in kernel development, kernel source is the best kernel guide. One has to get used to read the source other people have written and try to understand it. And when you'll be writing your code, try to write it so that other people will understand your code.


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